For Teachers

Letter to Educators

Introduction

 
Background

Why Study Rare Breeds?

ALBC Conservation Priorty List

spacer
 
Units

~ K-2 Overview

Kindergarden

~ 3-5 Overview

spacer
 
Resources

Slideshow

PDFs
Farm Visits


Fifth Grade Unit: EXPLORE

Explore
: SLIDESHOW ABOUT RARE BREEDS, PART 1 AND 2; INTRO TO THE FARM AND THE BREEDS THERE. BREED PICKS AND BEGIN RESEARCH, PUT ON TIMELINE.

 

KEY CONCEPTS

• Geographic distribution
• Adaptation to specific climates
• Immigration and Settlement
• Colonial Times, colonization
• Westward Expansion and the Agrarian Economy
• Your state or the United States

 

SUMMARY

Begin the lesson asking them to try and define a rare breed. Prompt as needed. Show the slideshow parts 1 and 2. Introduce the breeds they will see at the farm. Divide the class into species groups and from there, into breeds as available for study at the farm. Have students begin on-line research about the species and breeds before heading out to the farm.

 

Materials needed:

Slideshow, internet connection.

 

DIRECTIONS

DEFINE A RARE BREED

1. Students have had a brief introduction to the concept of rare breeds. Give students a chance to think about their own knowledge. Based on the little slideshow of the previous day, what do they think determines that a breed is rare?

2. Most kids (and adults too!) have never given farm animals much thought, and certainly never considered that they could be rare or endangered, so this should prompt some discussion.

3. They will likely mention:

a. there are few in number
b. they had heritage uses
c. some immigrated to the United States in the past
d. some were developed here
e. they have adaptations and unique traits that made them useful at one time in the past
f. they are often suited to a particular climate
g. they cannot compete with specialized breeds today so they are threatened with extinction.

 

SLIDE SHOW

1. Next, introduce the details of rare and endangered farm animals using the ALBC slide show parts 1 and 2.

2. The slide show, if you use the script, takes about 20-30 minutes. Plan at least an hour for the whole session, so that you can have time to talk about the idea of rare and endangered farm animals.

3. It is designed to be read in segments. This will be a large group activity. Consider allowing everyone to sit on the floor on a big carpet and projecting the slides onto a white board or movie screen for large image impact.

4. At this point the kids are hopefully getting pretty interested in these animals. It helps to get excited yourself! Make sure to point out the "cool" and unique aspects of the animals mentioned in the slide show, and point out how "at risk" our current agricultural system is since it is based on monoculture.

 

BREED PICKS

1. Divide the class into species groups and from there, into breeds that are available for study at the farm. Or, have the students choose an animal to research.

2. After the farm's breeds are chosen, encourage them to choose from the variety of species (ducks, chickens, cows, horses, goats, sheep, pigs, turkeys. ). (If you don't you may get lots of folks doing horses and not much else!) The ALBC web site has a great list of possibilities.

3. Also it is helpful to have a variety of books and magazines that students can look through to get ideas (since they probably don't know many of these animals). Some students may have seen an animal on the slide show that interested them, or they may use the card game to find an animal they like. Encourage the kids to do a little digging before they choose.

4. Have students begin on-line research about the species and breeds before heading out to the farm.

5. Direct students to answer the 5 W's:

a. Who: Name the species, the breed and (if any) the individual.
b. What: Unique Traits and abilities/adaptations of the breed.
c. Where: Country of Origin
d. Why: Human uses. Values.
e. When: Imported to the US or developed here?
f. How: Was it replaced. How did it become rare?

 

TIMELINE

1. Make a time line, or have some students make it. (This is a great math activity and students that finish their animal posters before everyone else could make the time line. )

2. Make it pretty large! For example, run across one whole wall.

3. Consider starting it at about 1400 and continuing to present day. . . your scale will depend on the length of the wall you put it on. For instance, if your wall is about 25 feet long, then your scale could be 1/2 inch = 1 year. (1 foot would equal 24 years). You would then be able to start your timeline at about 1400 and go to 2000 (if you had 2. 5 more inches you could get to 2005 or you could start at a later time. )

 

RESOURCES

A Vanishing Feast, D. Hinshaw Patent;
Taking Stock: The North American Livestock Census, Bixby et al.

Navigating the Unit

nav
5th - 5 E Summary
5th - Engage
5th - Explore
5th - Explain
5th - Expand
5th - Evaluate
5th - Supplement

Noah's Ark Today is property of the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.
Copyright 2006.

American Livestock Breeds Conservancy, PO Box 477, Pittsboro, NC 27312